Grade 6 Social Studies - Big Idea #3

Compare and analyze location, place, and movement within the United States. EGSA 5: Knowledge of Major elements of geographical study and analysis and their relationship to changes in society and the environment. PPGS 3: Knowledge of principles and processes of governance systems. USH 2a: Knowledge of continuity and change in the history of Missouri, the United States and the world. PCD 1: Knowledge of principles expressed in documents shaping constitutional democracy in the United States. Communication Arts/Writing 1: Apply a writing process in composing text. Communication Arts/Writing 3: Write effectively in various forms and types of writing.

 

Unit and Duration:

United States Government/9 class sessions

Strands (knowledge standards):

Elements of Geographical Study and Analysis, Principles and Processes of Governance Systems, United States History, Tools of Social Science Inquiry, Principles of Constitutional Democracy, Communication Arts Writing

GLEs and District Performance Indicators:  

Students should be able to:

1.   Locate places and physical features of the United States and Missouri on maps, and indicate how these locations relate to each other.

2.   Identify basic cultural, physical and economic characteristics of major regions in Missouri and the United States.

2.   Describe how the United States changed throughout its history.

3.   Interpret and construct time lines.

4.   Use the concept of "region" in categorizing and comparing places.

5.   Describe what may be found in different regions, compare regions.

6.   Draw conclusions and inferences from various regions and maps.

7.   Differentiate between value judgments, facts and factual claims, and opinions about events and people.

8.   Demonstrate skill in using how-to-study/learn strategies taught in social studies.

 

EGSA 5B6: Locate major cities and nations of the world. Locate the world's continents, oceans, and major topographic features.

EGSA 5C6: Describe physical characteristics, such as climate, topography, relationship to water and ecosystems. Describe human characteristics, such as people's education, language, diversity, economies, religions, settlement patterns, ethnic background and political system.

PPGS 3A6: Define limited and unlimited governments and how people's lives vary under these systems.

USH 2aC5: Explain the American Revolution, including the perspectives of patriots and loyalists and factors that explain why the American colonists were successful.

USH 2aD5: Relate the drafting of the Constitution and the formation of a new nation.

 

Communication Arts W1A6: Follow a writing process to choose and use an appropriate graphic organizer.

Communication Arts W3D6: Write summaries of text from magazines, newspapers and/ or informational articles.

Show-Me Goals/Standards and GLEs (codes):

SS 5 MO 1.8 2.3 3.6 GLEs: ComArts W1A6/W3D6 EGSA 5B6/5C6 PPGS 3A6 USH 2aC5/2aD5 TSSI 7C6 PCD 1A6

Activities:

6th Grade Social Studies

U.S. Geography and Government Unit/Chapter 4

 

Materials for lessons are available in the U.S. Geography and Government Unit Notebook in the 6th grade Social Studies classrooms.

 

 

Lesson 1

Benchmark #1: Students should know: the location, place, and movement within the Western Hemisphere.

Performance Indicator #1: Locate types of natural features, human made features, and political units on maps and globes.

Performance Indicator #2: Locate places of the world on maps and globes, and describe how their locations relate to each other.

 

Bell work: Type 1 Writing (remind students to skip lines with X's)

List as many places in the U.S.A. and a physical feature that can be found there in a T-chart.

 

Materials: Textbook, Geography: The World and Its People; one copy per student of "Physical Regions of the U.S.;" one copy per student of "Where in the U.S.A.?;" atlases

 

1.   Introduce Chapter 4 by surveying pages 115-119. Identify the seven physical regions of the U.S.: Coastal Plains, Appalachian Mountains, Interior Plains, Mountains and Basins, Pacific Coast, Alaska, and Hawaii. Survey pages 120-122 to identify the four major climate zones found in the U.S.: Tropical, Dry, Mid-Latitude, and High Latitude.

2.   Students will make a vocabulary foldable for the "Terms to Know" on page 115 (3 terms) in their spiral.

3.   Pass out "Physical Regions of the U.S." Go over directions reminding students that there will be 3 answers for each section.

4.   Students will read pages 115-119 with a partner completing "Physical Regions of the U.S." as they read.

5.   Students should then read pages 120-122 to review the various climates of the U.S.

6.   Students will use atlases to complete "Where in the U.S.A?"

7.   Students should study to prepare for Quiz 4:1 during the next class session.

 

 

Skip Lesson 4:2
(covered in the Economics Unit)


Lesson 2

Benchmark #7: Evaluate governments of the Western Hemisphere.

Performance Indicator #1: Recognize the characteristics of limited and unlimited governments (democracy, monarchy, and dictatorship).

Benchmark #1: Students should know: the location, place, and movement within the Western Hemisphere.

Performance Indicator #4: Explain why places and types of places are located where they are.
Performance Indicator #6: Select appropriate maps for specific purposes.

 

Bell work:

1.   Describe the Continental Divide. (Rocky Mountain ridge that separates rivers that flow west and east)

2.   What evidence indicates that the Appalachian Mountains are the oldest mountains in North America? (rounded, eroded peaks)

 

Materials: Textbook, Geography: The World and Its People; Quiz 4:1; one copy per student of the "Timeline Graphic Organizer"

 

1.   Review the vocabulary terms and key concepts from Lesson 4:1.

2.   Check the "Physical Regions of the U.S." in class and report scores.

3.   Take Quiz 4:1, check in class, and report scores.

4.   Students will make a vocabulary foldable for the "Terms to Know" on page 130 (10 terms) in their spiral.

5.   Distribute the "Timeline Graphic Organizer" and guide students in going through the correct order of the spaces provided for taking notes.

6.   Students will read pages 130-132, "A Rich History," with a partner completing the graphic organizer as they read.

7.   Students should take notes on the following:

A.   Identify the U.S. as a democracy, a form of government in which the people rule. The U.S. is a
democratic republic because the people VOTE for representatives to make many decisions for the
good of the people. The U.S. is also a federal republic, or a government divided between national
and state powers with a president who leads the national government.

B.   A monarchy is a form of government in which a king or queen inherits the right to rule a
country. Great Britain and Japan are monarchies.

C.   A dictatorship is a form of government in which the government is under the control of one all-
powerful leader. Cuba is the only dictatorship in the Western Hemisphere.

8.   Review the U.S. Population and Density map on page 133. Discuss the reasons why people settle where they do.

9.   Read pages 133-135. Emphasize the following terms: rural (countryside), urban (city), suburb (smaller community around a larger city).

10.  Students should study to prepare for Quiz 4:3 during the next class session.

 

 

 

Lesson 3

Benchmark #7: Evaluate governments of the Western Hemisphere.

Performance Indicator #3: Respect the rights of others; accept and carry out responsibilities.

Performance Indicator #4: Identify and describe rights and responsibilities of citizens.

Performance Indicator #7: Identify and explain with examples how what one person or group wants to do may need to be restricted for the good of others.

Performance Indicator # 8: Identify rules, laws, and practices of government that promote specific democratic values; propose rules that provide for order and fairness in group situations and that help prevent and solve problems.

Performance Indicator #10: Distinguish examples of decision making processes that are democratic from those that are not, giving reasons.

Performance Indicator #12: Identify ways to promote effective group decision making, and act in accordance with those ways: practice courteous behavior, follow rules and established discussion procedures, listen to others, contribute ideas, suggest alternatives, withhold judgment until important facts are known, and accept decisions of the group once a final decision has been made.

 

Bell work:

1.   What route do experts think the first Americans took to reach North America? (land bridge from Asia)

2.   What document explains the form of government used in the U.S.? (The Constitution)

 

Materials: Textbook, Geography: The World and Its People; Quiz 4:3, Power Writing umbrella transparency, teacher directions for "Code of Conduct" activity, poster paper, stickers, colored markers

 

1.   Review the vocabulary terms and key concepts from Lesson 4:3.

2.   Students will complete Quiz 4:3, check in class, and report scores.

3.   Guide students through the œCode of Conduct" activity following the directions on the sheet provided. Student ideas will be incorporated into a classroom code of conduct that will be displayed in the room.

4.   Review the U.S. Constitution using a Power Writing Umbrella transparency (students should take notes in their spiral):

Power 1: U.S. Constitution
Power 2: Preamble
Power 3: Introduction to Constitution
Power 3: Explains the purpose of the Constitution
Power 2: Articles
Power 3: Sets up the government
Power 3: Three branches of government
Power 2: Amendments
Power 3: May change the Constitution
Power 3: First ten amendments = Bill of Rights,
protects the people

 

 

Lesson 4

Benchmark #7: Evaluate governments of the Western Hemisphere.

Performance Indicator #9: Identify the nature and purpose of a constitution.

Performance Indicator #11: Identify and explain any of the core beliefs and values that must be shared among a citizenry if a democratic government is to be secure.

 

Bell work: Type 2 Writing (remind students to skip lines with X's)
___ 6 lines
___ 3 content
___ 1 punctuation

 

Use the power writing graphic organizer on the U.S. Constitution to write a paragraph telling about the three sections of the document.

Materials: Textbook, Geography: The World and Its People, copies of key words from the Preamble, Preamble Mix-N-Match Cooperative Learning activity cards, one copy per student of the "We the People" worksheet

 

1.   Review the Power Writing Umbrella that outlines the U.S. Constitution.

2.   Preamble Activity:

A.   Read aloud the Preamble to the U.S. Constitution. Ask students what it means.

B.   Divide the class into 11 groups of 2 or 3.

C.   Provide one key word from the Preamble to each group.

D.   Each group will work cooperatively to define and draw a visual cue for the key word from the
Preamble.

E.   Each group will share their definition and visual cue with the class. Students should take notes on
the terms and visual cues.

F.   Reread the Preamble as a class. Ask again what the Preamble means, checking for comprehension.

3.   Mix-N-Match Cooperative Learning Game:

A.   Distribute one game card per student.

B.   Students may review the term or definition using their notes from the Preamble activity.

C.   Students may get up from their seat on the teacher's cue to "mix" about the room looking for the
person in class with the matching term or definition to their card.

D.   Once students find their match, they will stand with their partner to form a line.

E.   When all students have found their match, the teacher should go down the line to check for
accuracy of matches.

4.   Students will complete the "We the People" worksheet to identify synonyms for key words in the Preamble.

5.   Play Preamble Hangman using the ten terms on the worksheet as time allows. This is the traditional game. Simply use the terms studied as the "mystery" words.

 

 

Lesson 5

Benchmark #7: Evaluate governments of the Western Hemisphere.

Performance Indicator #2: Identify government activities as legislative, executive, or judicial.

Performance Indicator #9: Identify the nature and purpose of a constitution.

Performance Indicator #10: Distinguish examples of decision making processes that are democratic from those that are not, giving reasons (ongoing).

 

Bell work: Type 1 Writing (remind students to skip lines with X's)

Write 10+ lines explaining what you think this quote means:

"The Constitution of the U.S. is the result of the collective wisdom of our country." Abraham Lincoln

 

Materials: Textbook, Geography: The World and Its People, transparency of the Power Writing Umbrella graphic organizer, example of a foldable on the three branches of government, one piece of 9"x 12" red construction paper per student, one piece of 9" x 12" blue construction paper per student, one copy per student of job descriptions of the three branches of government, glue, scissors, hole punches

 

1.   Check the Preamble worksheet in class and report scores.

2.   Review the three parts of the U.S. Constitution: Preamble, Articles, and Amendments.

3.   This lesson will focus on the Articles, whose purpose is to set up our government. See the diagram on page 132 in the textbook. Use the transparency of the Power Writing Umbrella graphic organizer to describe the three branches of government. Students should add the following to their notes:
1. Articles of the U.S. Constitution
2. Legislative Branch
3. Makes the laws
2. Executive Branch
3. Carries out the laws
2. Judicial Branch
3. Interprets the laws
1. Articles of the U.S. Constitution

4.   Discuss checks and balances between the three branches.

5. Three Branches of Government Foldable Activity:

A. Show students an example of a foldable on the three branches of government. Explain that they
will work with a partner to review a list of jobs of the government to try to determine which
branch completes each job.

B.   Pass out the copies of government jobs to each student. They should use a pencil to mark each
job with an L for legislative, E for executive, or J for judicial BEFORE cutting them apart. They may
work with a partner. Get a teacher check for accuracy BEFORE cutting them apart.

C.   Students should then cut apart the strips of job descriptions and glue them on the flap for the
appropriate branch of government.

D.   Students will hole punch the foldable and add it to their S.S. folder to be used as a study guide.

 

 

Lesson 6

Benchmark #7: Evaluate governments of the Western Hemisphere.

Performance Indicator #2: Identify government activities as legislative, executive, or judicial.

Performance Indicator #5: Predict consequences that follow when rights are denied or abused or when citizens fail to carry out their responsibilities.

Performance Indicator #6: Compare rights and responsibilities of citizens of today to those of people living in other times and/or places (ongoing).

Performance Indicator #9: Identify the nature and purpose of a constitution.

 

Bell work: Type 2 Writing (remind students to skip lines with X's)
___ 6 lines
___ 3 content
___ 1 punctuation/capitalization

 

Name the three branches of government and explain the main duty of each. (legislative branch makes the laws, executive branch carries out the laws, judicial branch interprets the laws)

Materials: Textbook, Geography: The World and Its People, video, Scholastic News: "Our Three Branches of Government," transparency of "Help Wanted" sign, transparency of "Qualifications for Being President," transparencies of presidential candidates, group copies of "The Mini Page" set; "Three Branches of Government Quiz"

 

1.   Review the three branches of government and each branches powers from the previous lesson.

2.   Display the transparency of the œHelp Wanted" sign. Follow with the transparency of "Qualification for Being President." Students should take notes on the qualification in their spiral.

3.   Display each œcandidate" transparency. Students will indicate a thumbs up for those candidates that meet the qualifications to run for president and a thumbs down for those who do not.

4.   Discuss again the separation of powers and the checks and balances within our government system.

5.   Show the Scholastic News: "Our Three Branches of Government," video (35 minutes). Students should listen for and take notes in their spirals on examples of checks and balances.

6.   Students will complete the "Three Branches of Government Quiz."

7.   Review the three parts of the U.S. Constitution: Preamble, Articles, and Amendments. This portion of the lesson will focus on the Amendments, whose purpose is to protect U.S. citizens and allow for change in the constitution.

8.   Pass out a different set of "The Mini Page" to each group of four in the class. Each group should read the page aloud as a group and determine the VIP's (Very Important Points) to share with the class. These VIP's should be written in their spiral notes as any one of them may be asked to share.

9.   Ask one person from each group to share their VIP's from their notes during the next class period.

 

 

Lesson 7

Benchmark #7: Evaluate governments of the Western Hemisphere.

Performance Indicator #5: Predict consequences that follow when rights are denied or abused or when citizens fail to carry out their responsibilities.

Performance Indicator #6: Compare rights and responsibilities of citizens of today to those of people living in other times and/or places (ongoing).

Performance Indicator #9: Identify the nature and purpose of a constitution.

 

Bell work:

1.   Give two examples of checks and balances within the U.S. government. (some officials are elected while others are appointed; presidential veto; impeachment trials; etc.)

2.   Why is voting important? (gives citizens a voice in their government)

3.   How do you gain information to know who or what to vote for? (ads, newspapers, debates, T.V., etc.)

 

Materials: Textbook, Geography: The World and Its People, "Join the Debate" question strips, transparency of "Join the Debate" questions, transparency of Power Writing Umbrella graphic organizer; one copy per student of the "Amendments to the Constitution"

 

1.   Review the three parts of the U.S. Constitution and the purpose of each.

2.   Pass out the "Amendments to the Constitution" study sheet.

3.   Join the Debate Activity:

A.   Explain that the Bill of Rights is a living document whose application continues to grow and
develop over time, helping to shape the society in which we live. Many of the issues surrounding
this important document and the freedoms it protects are frequently debated. Our court systems
interpret the laws and therefore make decisions based on the amendments of the constitution.

B.   Students will now join the debate by reading a situation and then trying to determine which of the
first ten amendments would address the problem.

C.   Pass out one strip per group of four students. Allow time for them to discuss the situation with
their group using "Amendments to the Constitution" to determine which amendment applies.

D.   Display the transparency of the "Join the Debate" questions.

E.   Read situation aloud and ask all students to determine the amendment that they think applies.

F.   Ask the team what decision they made and why.

G.   Other students may then œdebate" if they think a different amendment applies. They must give
their reasoning.

4.   Discuss what happens when rights are denied or abused or when citizens fail to carry out their responsibilities.

5.   Power Writing Activity:

A.   Students will write a power paragraph based on three amendments that they think are very important.

B.   Display the transparency of the Power Writing Umbrella graphic organizer. Students should copy
the writing guidelines in their spiral as follows:
1. Three important amendments
2. Amendment #__ says
3. It's important because
2. Amendment #__ says
3. It's important because
2. Amendment #__ says
3. It's important because
1. Three important amendments

C.   Students may use their study guide to choose any three amendments to write about. They should
complete the Power Writing plan and then use it to write a paragraph before the next class
session.

 

 

Lesson 8: Review

Benchmark #7: Evaluate governments of the Western Hemisphere.

 

Bell work: Study your notes, vocabulary foldables, and textbook to prepare for the review game.

 

Materials: Textbook, Geography: The World and Its People, Jeopardy Review Game

 

1.   Students will share their Power paragraphs with a partner in the classroom.

2.   Play the Jeopardy Game to review for the U.S.A. Test: Physical Features, Climates, & Government.

 

 

Lesson 9: Assessment

Benchmark #7: Evaluate governments of the Western Hemisphere.

 

Bell work: Study your notes, vocabulary foldables, and textbook to prepare for the review game.

 

Materials: The United States of America Test: Physical Features, Climates, & Government

 

1.   Allow students time to review notes, textbook, and handouts for Chapter 4.

2.   Students will complete the Chapter 4 test and hand it in.

Relevant Links: 

 

Assessments:

1. District Developed Assessment (see in files marked U. S.) 2. Mind Jogger Video quiz (in cabinet in classroom) 3. Physical map of U.S. (see worksheet in files) 4. Participation in classroom activities (see worksheets in files) 5. Regions of the United States (see worksheet in files) 6. Physical Location Quiz (see in files) 7. Web Diagram of United States (see in files) 8.Timelines (see prompt in files)

 

Relevant Links:  

Resources:

Materials for lessons are available in the U.S. Geography and Government Notebook in the 6th grade Social Studies classrooms. Glencoe textbook: Geography The World and Its People (in classroom) Hands On Geography (resource book in classroom) Maptime...USA (resource book in classroom) World Geography (resource book in classroom)

 

Relevant Links:  

http://gwip.glencoe.com
Access to Chapter 4 Overview


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